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By David RichmanManaging Director, Advisor Institute

For the past two years, existing and prospective clients experienced their own unique journeys with their health, families, businesses and, potentially, even shifting mindsets and priorities. This is no time for superficiality. Rather it is the perfect opportunity to ask better questions, deepen client connectivity and collaborate consciously.

Let's consider a potential reframing of three questions originally crafted to help advisors learn more about a client's or prospect's attitude about money1:

  • Original: "What does money mean to you?"
  • Reframed: "How have the past two years influenced your thoughts on the meaning — and value — of money?"

  • Instead of: "Do you think money can make you happy?"
  • Try: "Reflecting on your experiences, what are your thoughts on the old adage 'money can't buy happiness'?"

  • Then: "How much money would you like to have?"
  • Now: "Has recent uncertainty reshaped your thinking on how much money you would like to have for the future?"

Use these questions with prospects and longtime clients alike to help them consider how these past few years may have changed their perspectives and priorities.

Bottom line: Conscious collaboration starts with the questions you ask — and can lead to newfound opportunities.