The Advisor Institute: Coach's Corner
Power down and recharge

Practical messages intended to help you elevate the success of your practice.

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      By David GordonDirector, Eaton Vance Advisor Institute

      Do you find yourself feeling more tired than you expect to feel? A common theme in many conversations with colleagues and advisors is a feeling of exhaustion that seems completely out of proportion to a comparatively sedentary lifestyle for the last several months.

      What could explain this? Could it be that customary restorative activities, such as attending sporting events, vacations with family and friends, or traveling to new places play a bigger role than we realize in regenerating and reenergizing us?

      Just as we need to occasionally power down and restart our electronic devices, we need to "power down" occasionally in order to recharge physically, mentally and even emotionally. If you've missed out on your usual restorative activities, you may be missing out on the benefits of powering down.

      Is it any different for your clients? Probably not. While there is no true substitute for the real thing, you may be able to offer a bit of restoration through conversation:

      • Ask clients who love to travel to share stories and pictures from their favorite trips
      • Ask clients who normally play sports or attend games to share their favorite sports memories
      • Ask clients who are missing visits with their families to tell you about their children and grandchildren. (Hint: Block extra time for this conversation!)

      Bottom line: These simple acts might seem trivial, but they can help you and your clients feel reenergized as we head into a new year.